SOAP MAKING PDF

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The art of making soap has been passed down through generations and today, is slowly becoming a lost art. Cold Process soaping requires the use. It_Starts_With_Food__Discover_the_Whole30_-_Hartwig,preacharapapta.gq It Making liquid soap is easier if the solid bars are made from an oil that results in a . This Soap Making Guide shows you how to make perfect soap that is better than what you can download at the store! Book contains 71 soap recipes. FREE GIFT: The.


Soap Making Pdf

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Soap making can be as simple or as complicated as you'd like. Making your own soap allows you to choose the ingredients and fragrances that go into it. ✦soap mold. ✦digital scale. ✦2 measuring cups. ✦immersion blender. ✦spatula. ✦mixing spoon. ✦melting pot (oils). ✦stainless steel stock pot (lye water). A brief history on soap making. • The basic chemistry of soap making. • Mold choices and preparation. • Soapmaking tools. • Oil properties as they contribute to.

Do not let drip Press down the ashes well, make a flat top until all ashes are wet. Then let drip very and slowly add hot water first, room slowly. Do not let drip until all ashes are wet. Then let drip Test the lye coming out with an egg; very slowly. Save all separately and cover well. Use mason jars for airtight storage. Let stand overnight. Mix well, and let stand overnight. The better the oils are incorporated stirred Before heating it stir well.

Soap Manufacturing Technology

Check there is enough space above the soap surface so it does not foam over. Stir occasionally and keep a close eye on it. The next morning simmer the soap until it When it starts to foam, stir well and instead rises up, then cool down and simmer again.

Simmer for about eight hours. Simmer for hours, stir occasionally. Rub it between the fingers, if it feels oily and does not taste sharp add some extra lye When the soap becomes thick, sticks to the this is what the different grades lye are for. When the soap resembles Vaseline; it sticks And he who has experience knows what to to the spoon, it parts when stirred and stays do in one boil.

The original Recipe. To make black Sope for clothes, with all the signes and tokens that it giueth and maketh in beiling. TAke thirty pounde of vnsleckt white lime, if you can get it, and that is in greate hole peces and not in pouder, and foure skore and tenne pounde of the strongest ashes you can finde.

And lette all so well be mixed, that a man may not knowe or discerne the lime from the dust or ashes, and water it so much round about, that in taking a hand full of the same matier, and in wringing it, it cleaue togither.

And whan you see that it raiseth no more pouder or dust, giue it no more water. And if it be in cold weather you maie couer it, for feare that it take no colde and so lo se his heate, for than it would make no good magistrale. And whan the egge sinketh in the lie, put that se cond by it selfe: and if you can gette of the first fo[ And note, that vnto three pound of the saide lie, you muste haue one pound of oile, and in pouring it in sturre and mixe it well with a stick, for feare that the oile be not hurt by the violence of the saide lie: And make this composi tion at night, to the intent that it maie remaine in in fusion all the night: then in the morning seeth it the space of seuen or eight houres or more, 5 according as the quantite is great or little: for whan it is aboue a hundreth pound, it must seeth ten houres or more: and whan it beginneth to seeth and swell much, take it by and by from the fire, and sturre it alwaies aboue vn till it beginne to boile softly.

And in the meane time cease not to sturre it, for feare it burne to the bottom.

And whan you make the composition in a caudron, let it neuer be full by a hand breadth, bicause it riseth and swelleth alwaies in seething, and the oile would bee loste: and mixyng it oftentimes the oile incor porateth with the lie, and seedeth the sooner. And whan it hath sodden about eight or nine houres, you maie beginne to assaie and proue it, and see that you keepe alwaies a little of the firste and of the seconde for all occasitions that maie chaunce.

And whan it hath boiled vnto the saide houre, you shall see it waxe thicke, and make the bubbles in seething long and thicke. Than maie you beginne to make your profe and assaie. That is to saie, in taking a little of it with a spoone, and putting it into a little earthen dishe, and lette it coole, then cut it with a little sticke, and if it close togither againe, it is a signe that it is sodden inough: and if it doe not close togither againe, it is not, and therefore finishe the seething of it.

And make many of these proofes and assaies. And whan it is sod den, take the fire from vnder it, and so take it of, and sette it in some coole place, and whan it is colde you maie occupie of it, and it will be good and parfite. And if you make it with cleere oile although it bee strong, it is all one: but if you make it with oile parcht or thicke, it will not bee verie cleere.

And whan you haue taken vp a lit tel, and haue lette it coole and so cut it, and than if it be ferme and faste on the sides, and in setting it vp it tarry vpright, than it is sodden. And he that hath experience of this knoweth what is to be done in seeyng it boile onely. And whan you see that it is well take it from the fire. Unedited, except for the addition of paragraphs for ease of reading. To make lye summarized : Use unslaked lime [quick lime] in pieces, not powder, and the strongest ashes [hardwood] you can find.

Pile the lime up and heap the ashes around the lime, like making mortar, and with a rush broom, gently sprinkle water all over it so the lime will activate. If the weather is cold you may cover it so it does not loose the heat and slow or stop the reaction, for then it is no good.

When filling, press down equally as much as you can, make a flat top and pour in some hot water. To know the difference between first, second and third lye, take a fresh egg wound around with a thread [to be able to take it back out] and as the first lye comes out float the egg on it. Save this lye for as long as it floats as this is the best lye. When the egg starts to sink, save this separately as the second lye, you should be able to get 4 parts first lye [floating, with a quarter of the shell showing], three parts second lye [hovering in the middle of the jar], 2 parts third lye [touching bottom but still upright] and as much fourth lye as you want [when the egg settles flat on the bottom the density of water is reached].

Save all these separately and cover them well so that they do not evaporate or breath out [lye is hygroscopic and will pull moisture from the air] and they should be fine for about a year. To make soap: Use 3 pounds of egg bearing lye to 1 pound of oil, pour the oil in and stir and mix well. Do this in the evening so that the infusion can stand overnight.

In the morning start to simmer it, for seven to eight hours; if it is over pounds simmer ten hours or more. When it starts to simmer and rise up a lot, take it from the fire and stir it well until it starts to go down again. Keep stirring so it does not get burned to the bottom. When you use a cauldron leave a hand width of space because the soap rises and swells in cooking and oil would be lost. The more it is stirred and the oils incorporate well with the lye, the sooner it simmers.

When it has simmered for about eight or nine hours it is time to take samples and check. Make sure to have some first and second lye ready as needed.

When it has boiled until the right time you shall see it become thick, and make long and thick bubbles when simmering. Then cut it with a little stick and if it closes again it is a sign it has cooked enough; if it does not close, it is not finished, so keep simmering it [is this reversed? Take many samples and check. When it is cooked, take it off the fire and set it in a cool place, and when it is cold you can start using it, and it will be good and perfect.

One of the best signs that you may see is that when it begins to thicken, pull some up with a spoon — when the stretchy threads break without shrinking back up again, this is a sign it has cooked enough.

And when you take a little, and let it cool and cut it, and it is firm and solid at the edges, and it stays upright, then it is cooked enough. And if it was not cooked enough, if it did not have the stretchy threads, add a little of the first lye, a little bit at a time, and let it boil for an hour, or a half. Then test again, and if it is still not good, add a little more, until it has a firm and solid body, but not too soft or too hard. And he who has experience knows what to do in one boil.

Strength of lye? This is also the strength mentioned in many Colonial recipes for making drip ash lye, and the soap that reenacters complain of as being so harsh. This is Laundry Soap or Black Soap and is meant to be harsh to better to clean cloths with.

It is also harsh on the washed fabrics resulting in wear and tear and if the garments are not rinsed well soap remnants in the clothes are known to itch… good reasons why wealthy households would download their soap and not make it themselves difference between just harsh enough and too harsh. This does not mean all soft soap is harsh, only that laundry soap recipes make harsher soaps. An example from the first book of The secretes of the reuerende Maister Alexis of Piemount Containyng excellent remedies against diuers diseases by Girolamo Ruscelli shows the following recipe for shampoo.

It also uses the amounts of thre pottels of lye to one pot of oyl, the ratio that consistently works well for me. A very exquisyte sope, made of diuers thinges.

Description

TAke Aluminis catini thre vnces, quicke lyme one part stronge lye that will beare an egge swimminge be twene two waters, thre pottels, a pot of commun oyle: mengle all well together, puttinge to it the white of an Egge well beaten, and a dysshefull of the meale or floure of Amylum, and an vnce of Romayne Vitrioll, 55 or redde leade well beaten into poulder, and mixe it continuallye for the space of three houres, then lette it stande, by the space of a daye, and it will bee righte and perfite.

Finallye, take it oute, and cutte it in pieces: af ter sette it to drie twoo daies, in the wynde, but not in the sunne. Occupie alwaies of this sope, when you will washe youre head, for it is verie holsome, and maketh faier heare. Ruscelli 8 How to make soft soap, the Medieval way.

A step by step modern how to manual. Fill a 5 gallon bucket with filtered ashes, tamping down intermittently for a tight fit.

Level the top leaving about 2 inches of headroom. Additives are used to enhance the color, texture, and scent of soap. Fragrances and perfumes are added to the soap mixture to The above illustrations show the kettle process of making soap.

The Art of Soap-making

Abrasives to enhance the texture of soap include talc, silica, and marble pumice volcanic ash. Soap made without dye is a dull grey or brown color, but modern manufacturers color soap to make it more enticing to the consumer. The Manufacturing Process The kettle method of making soap is still used today by small soap manufacturing companies.

This process takes from four to eleven days to complete, and the quality of each batch is inconsistent due to the variety of oils used. Around , engineers and scientists developed a more efficient manufacturing process, called the continuous process.

This procedure is employed by large soap manufacturing companies all around the world today. Exactly as the name states, in the continuous process soap is produced continuously, rather than one batch at a time.

Technicians have more control of the production in the continuous process, and the steps are much quicker than in the kettle method—it takes only about six hours to complete a batch of soap.

The Kettle Process Boiling 1 Fats and alkali are melted in a kettle, which is a steel tank that can stand three stories high and hold several thousand pounds of material. Steam coils within the kettle heat the batch and bring it to a boil. After boiling, the mass thickens as the fat reacts with the alkali, producing soap and glycerin. Salting 2 The soap and glycerin must now be separated.

The mixture is treated with salt, causing the soap to rise to the top and the glycerin to settle to the bottom. The glycerin is extracted from the bottom of the kettle. Strong change 3 To remove the small amounts of fat that have not saponified, a strong caustic solution is added to the kettle.

This step in the process is called "strong change. The batch may be given another salt treatment at this time, or the manufacturer may proceed to the next step.

The Art of Soap-making

Pitching 4 The next step is called "pitching. The mass eventually separates into two layers. The lower layer, called "nigre," contains most of the impurities in the soap such as dirt and salt, as well as most of the water. The neat soap is taken off the top. The soap is then cooled. The finishing process is the Developed around and used by today's major soap-making companies, the above illustrations show the continuous process of making soap.

The Continuous Process Splitting 1 The first step of the continuous process splits natural fat into fatty acids and glycerin. The equipment used is a vertical stainless steel column with the diameter of a barrel called a hydrolizer. It may be as tall as 80 feet 24 m. Pumps and meters attached to the column allow precise measurements and control of the process. This splits the fat into its two components.

The fatty acid and glycerin are pumped out continuously as more fat and water enter.

The fatty acids are then distilled for purification. Mixing 2 The purified fatty acids are next mixed with a precise amount of alkali to form soap. Other ingredients such as abrasives and fragrance are also mixed in. The hot liquid soap may be then whipped to incorporate air. Cooling and finishing 3 The soap may be poured into molds and allowed to harden into a large slab.

It may also be cooled in a special freezer. The slab is cut into smaller pieces of bar size, which are then stamped and wrapped.

The entire continuous process, from splitting to finishing, can be accomplished in several hours. Milling 4 Most toiletry soap undergoes additional processing called milling. The milled bar lathers up better and has a finer consistency than non-milled soap.That is to saie, in taking a little of it with a spoone, and putting it into a little earthen dishe, and lette it coole, then cut it with a little sticke, and if it close togither againe, it is a signe that it is sodden inough: and if it doe not close togither againe, it is not, and therefore finishe the seething of it.

Lard To be used as a base oil, lard will tend to be soft, and may not be at its best when introduced to cold water. Fill a 5 gallon bucket with filtered ashes, tamping down intermittently for a tight fit. Once you find your perfect recipe you can start getting creative with the designs. The milled bar lathers up better and has a finer consistency than non-milled soap. And note, that vnto three pound of the saide lie, you muste haue one pound of oile, and in pouring it in sturre and mixe it well with a stick, for feare that the oile be not hurt by the violence of the saide lie: And make this composi tion at night, to the intent that it maie remaine in in fusion all the night: then in the morning seeth it the space of seuen or eight houres or more, 5 according as the quantite is great or little: for whan it is aboue a hundreth pound, it must seeth ten houres or more: and whan it beginneth to seeth and swell much, take it by and by from the fire, and sturre it alwaies aboue vn till it beginne to boile softly.

To know the difference between first, second and third lye, take a fresh egg wound around with a thread [to be able to take it back out] and as the first lye comes out float the egg on it. Cool down before use, real hot lye added to oils can scald the soap but also this way, superfluous salts will settle out of solution and a more pure lye water can be poured off the next day.

TIMOTHY from Carrollton
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